Western Australia to use “archaic” method to cull sharks

By John Upton

Great white sharks are among Earth’s most formidable predators. They are apex predators. They prey on fish, mammals and birds — but nothing preys on them.

Except humans.

And in Western Australia, the state government, tired of losing surfers and other beach-goers to the toothy jaws of these ferocious elasmobranchs, has become a predator.

“The preservation of human life is our number one priority,” said Troy Buswell, the state’s fisheries minister, in announcing new policies that will see white sharks killed if they venture within a kilometer of popular beaches. The state’s decision to cull sharks has sparked a global controversy, and polling suggests that even West Australians are overwhelmingly opposed.

Illustrated by Perry Shirley.
Illustrated by Perry Shirley.

“The decision by Western Australia officials to cull sharks off the coast is alarming,” said Ashley Blacow, a policy and communications official with nonprofit Oceana. “Sharks play a critical role in keeping ocean ecosystems healthy. The presence of sharks ultimately increases species stability and diversity of the overall ecosystem. White sharks in particular are a vulnerable species and they should be protected, not killed.”

One of Western Australia’s most controversial approaches to culling sharks will see floating drums placed around beaches, attached to baited hooks. The trapping equipment are known as “drum lines” — and conservationists regard them as appallingly cruel. Drum lines are illegal in many parts of the world, including in the U.S. One shark expert described the killing method as “archaic” in an interview with Nature.

“Drum lines are 55-gallon steel drums with heavy tackle-like chains or large lines connected to bait,” David McGuire, director of Shark Stewards, told us. “They’re usually anchored to the bottom or they can be linked in chains. I’ve seen them used illegally in Mexico to catch sharks. Essentially, the shark bites the bait, is hooked, and drowns.”

Perhaps most troublingly, there is a lack of scientific evidence that such culling actually protects humans from shark attacks. It might feel satisfying to kill a member of a species that has been killing humans, but that sense of satisfaction might be more of the revenge variety than anything else. Hawaii culled nearly 5,000 sharks between 1959 to 1976, yet there was no change in the rate at which sharks attacked humans in those same waters.

Unfortunately, it may take years of shark culling and shark attacks before the West Australian government can determine whether its new policies are having the effect that it desires.

“True effectiveness cannot be assessed by simply counting the number of sharks captured and killed,” writes University of Hawaii researcher Carl Mayer in an article published by The Conversation. “Demonstrable effectiveness means a measurable decrease in shark bite incidents in response to culling activities.”